Tuesday, September 11, 2012

a man should use a word like "essential" carefully



1. So Jake, if you think that their task is too essential to allow them to strike, why do you want to pay them like shit and destroy their benefits? 

2. Seriously: what in the holy name of fuck has Jacob Weisberg ever contributed to the human species, beyond occasional sensual shoulder rubs for Mickey Kaus and cleaning up enough of Matt Yglesias's relentless misspellings that his conjectural musings can be appreciated by the world's imbeciles? And I guaran-goddamn-tee you that Jacob Weisberg makes way, way more than your average Chicago teacher. So what are the priorities here? People like Weisberg always talk a big game about how teaching is important, but they don't want teachers to make a significant fraction of what they make, even though their jobs are, well, meaningless bullshit.

Is your job essential, Jake?  Does the world really need articles like "A Better Way to Prepare a Mint Julep" and "Why It's Feminist to Call Your Mom a Cunt" and "Maybe Mitt Romney is Actually the Blacker Candidate" and shitty TV recaps by twee undersexed Wire-quoting pencil-dicked mawkish "post-political" Harvard-philosophy-major careerist grinders whose sole concerns are playing grabass with underage interns and worrying about whether anybody important will tweet their shitty piece comparing Sons of Anarchy to late period Walter Benjamin? Would we all suffer without those things? I mean Jesus, I think Troy Patterson can come up with yet another article proclaiming what an advanced sophisticate he is without the late night Gchat mutual fellatio sessions. We will find a way to survive without another article about how black is actually white and how the Monkees were secretly better than the Beatles and how it's actually pleasurable to pour scalding hot coffee on your balls and also too innovative innovators innovating innovatively. Your painfully unfunny sports podcasts and senior semiotics seminar paper-like hamhanded movie reviews would probably limp their wretched ways onto the Internet without you. 

I'm saying: we make choices, all the time, about the kind of society we really want, about what we're willing to actually pay for. 

8 comments:

individualfrog said...

As seems to be usual these days, he thinks of "the right to strike" as something granted from above. You don't need permission to strike.

Anonymous said...

Why can't essential also be cheap? Like water.

Anonymous said...

Kind of interesting that this is right after a post about twilight of the elites. Particularly if you place the emphasis on services rather than essential in Weisberg's tweet. The imperious tone and feelings of entitlement to the services seem awfully aristocratic.

Anonymous said...

Does the world really need articles like "A Better Way to Prepare a Mint Julep" and "Why It's Feminist to Call Your Mom a Cunt" and "Maybe Mitt Romney is Actually the Blacker Candidate" and shitty TV recaps by twee undersexed Wire-quoting pencil-dicked mawkish "post-political" Harvard-philosophy-major careerist grinders whose sole concerns are playing grabass with underage interns and worrying about whether anybody important will tweet their shitty piece comparing Sons of Anarchy to late period Walter Benjamin?

180 180 180

matt said...

Straight up. But let's not hang this on the Harvard Philosophy Department.

ovaut said...

you really can write, freddie. but you need to put your abilities into something better than blogposts

Marion Delgado said...

Cap his salary, Slate! We should start a campaign. Relentless. Hound Slate for a year. Cut all his salary and compensation until he makes as much as an average Chicago schoolteacher. Then let us set up a panel to tell him how to write - we'll call it the Slate/Jacob Weisberg Modernization Committee. Then I want his salary cut again but via outsourcing to freelancers, not Slate employees. This could be fun.

Jon said...

According to the "Digest of decisions and principles of the Freedom of Association Committee of the Governing Body of the ILO",
Fifth (revised) edition, article 585, teaching is not an essential service. It is, in fact, explicitly listed as *not* being essential in article 587.

(http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_norm/---normes/documents/publication/wcms_090632.pdf)

But this is a specialized definition with respect to right to strike. That is to say, it is conventionally recognized as an essential service, but so much so as to cast inhibitions on the freedom to strike in any way.

BTW, that one sentence, the 2nd of the 2nd paragraph: I thought it might never end, I hoped it wouldn't. ")